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How does tinnitus affect our military personnel
How do military personnel develop tinnitus?
Support from the American Tinnitus Association
Get involved!

How does tinnitus affect our military personnel

Tinnitus is a potentially devastating condition; its relentless noise is often an unwelcome reminder of war for many vets. The facts are disturbing:

  • Tinnitus is currently the number-one service-connected disability of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Tinnitus and hearing loss top the list of war-related health costs.
  • Since 2000, the number of veterans receiving service-connected disability for tinnitus has increased by at least 18 percent each year.
  • The total number of vets awarded disability compensation for tinnitus as of fiscal year 2006 surpassed 390,933.
  • At this alarming rate, 2011 will see 818,811 vets receiving military compensation for tinnitus, at a cost to American taxpayers of over $1.1 billion.

Tinnitus is a growing problem for America's military personnel. It threatens their futures with potential long-term sleep disruption, changes in cognitive ability, stress in relationships and employability challenges. These changes can be a blow to a vet's self-worth.

 

How do military personnel develop tinnitus?

The most common answer is exposure to very loud noise. Military personnel are exposed to excessive noise levels during combat, training simulations and on aircraft carriers that rattle like tin cans during takeoffs and landings.

Support from the American Tinnitus Association

ATA invites veterans and their supporters to become informed about the growing incidence of tinnitus among our military personnel. Simply fill out and submit this form to join the Action Alliance.

The Veterans Independent Budget is the only budget created by veterans, for veterans. This abstract from the FY 2009 Veterans Independent Budget includes information on how veterans are affected by tinnitus and recommendations to Congress to begin to remedy the problem.This is the second year tinnitus has been included in the Veterans  Independent Budget and it was a result of ATA’s advocacy and partnership with veterans organizations.

Get involved!

YOU can make a difference. Here’s how:

  • Join ATA's Action Alliance. You'll work with other passionate advocates to raise awareness about tinnitus and the need for increased funding for research.
  • Become an ATA member. Enjoy member benefits, including a year's subscription of our highly regarded Tinnitus Today magazine.
  • Donate to ATA. Your money goes toward funding research that will lead to a tinnitus cure. It’s a great way to honor and help vets who suffer from this debilitating condition.