Landmark Study - Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus

The American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO) released a landmark study of what treatments and therapies actually WORK for people with tinnitus.

Manage Your Tinnitus

Discover the proven tools and therapies that can minimize the burden of your tinnitus and improve your quality of life.

Sharing this study at ATA.org is part of the ATA’s larger effort to continue our dedication of providing solid, reliable sources of information about tinnitus to our members and to the tinnitus community at large.

The purpose of the study Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing tinnitus patients. Any clinician – including non-physicians – will find this information helpful. Anyone with some degree of tinnitus will find the study informative in that it provides real treatment options for tinnitus.

The full leadership panel can be found near the end of this article. However, the ATA is pleased to note that ATA alumni served on the study panel, notably Carol Bauer (Assistant Chair) and Scott Mitchell (Guideline Development Group) whom both served on the ATA Board of Directors.

We’ve posted a preview of the study Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus:

Objective. Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient’s quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome.

Purpose. The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

To view the full study, download a copy of it at ATA.org, or view it on the AAO’s website

Read the full summary.

Read the executive summary.

Abstract

The American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 13 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the impact of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

Purpose and Background

Leadership: David E. Tunkel, MD, (Chair), Carol A. Bauer, MD, (Assistant Chair), Gordon H. Sun, MD, MS (Assistant Chair), Richard M. Rosenfeld, MD, MPH (Methodologist)

Guideline Development Group: Sujana S. Chandrasekhar, MD; Eugene R. Cunningham Jr., MS; Sanford M. Archer, MD; Brian W. Blakely, MD, PhD; John M. Carter, MD; Evelyn C. Granieri, MD, MPH, MSEd; James A. Henry, PhD; Deena Hollingsworth, RN, MSN, FNP; Fawad A. Khan, MD; Scott Mitchell, JD,CPA; Ashkan Monfared, MD; Craig W. Newman, PhD; Folashade S. Omole, MD; C. Douglas Phillips, MD; Shannon K. Robinson, MD; Malcolm B. Taw, MD; Richard S. Tyler, PhD; Richard Waguespack, MD; Elizabeth J. Whamond.

The guideline was published as a supplement in the October 2014 issue of Otolaryngology —Head and Neck Surgery.

The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus.  The target audience is any clinician, including non-physicians, involved in managing these patients. Patients with tinnitus will often be evaluated by a variety of healthcare providers including primary care clinicians, specialty physicians, and non-physician providers such as audiologists and mental health professionals. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome.

Visit the Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus page at AAO

 

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